Archive | Penland People RSS feed for this section

Photo of the Week: Snow Leopard Parking

no parking sign at Penland

Today is the birthday of our food services manager, Richard Pleasants. Richard has a large fan club, which includes some extremely clever people. Two of them (code names DTB and IPH) were up late last night installing this sign on Richard’s customary parking place. The sign is made from steel and brass sheet metal. The spatula is forged steel. He is kind of like a snow leopard: lithe, white haired, and on task.

Comments { 0 }

Penland Studio Coordinator Show

BetsyDeWitt

Betsy DeWitt, from Upon Closer Examination, archival inkjet print of a 4″ round photomicrograph

 

Like Batman, Marie Curie, and Wallace Stevens who came before them, our studio coordinators live intense double lives, serving as the veritable rocks for the Penland studios during the day and making their own art (at night? When? How do they do it?)

 

deanallison

Dean Allison, Ally, cast and blown glass

 

susanfeagin

Susan Feagin, Square Bowl, mid-range clay, screen printed slips, sgraffito, colored glazes, 2011. Photo by Walker Montgomery.

 
We’re very excited to announce the opening of the Penland Studio Coordinator show at Green Plum Gallery, 130 Oak Avenue (Upper Street) in Spruce Pine, April 21. A reception will be held on April 25, 5:00-8:00 pm. Artists include:

 

Amanda Thatch (Textiles, works on paper)

Betsy DeWitt (Photography)

Ian Henderson (Metals)

Daniel T. Beck (Sculpture)

Sean P. Morrissey (Works on paper)

Susan Feagin (Ceramics)

Dean Allison (Cast and blown glass)

Marvin Jensen (Furniture)

 

amandathatch

Amanda Thatch, detail from Begin Again, textile

 

sean_p_morrissey

Sean P. Morrissey, Pile #2, collage on panel, 60 x 30

 

The show, dubbed In the Beginning There Was Marvin: 8 Coordinators, 15 Studios, will be on view these dates and hours:

Monday, April 21: 4-7 pm

Tuesday, April 22: 4-7 pm

Wednesday, April 23: 4-7 pm

Thursday, April 24: 4-7 pm

Friday, April 25: 5-8 pm (reception)

Saturday, April 26: 10-5 pm

Sunday, April 27: 11-3 pm 

 

ianhenderson

Ian Henderson, Partum, bronze, gold-plated silver, ash

 

Some of the works included in this blog post will be on view. Some won’t. Expect the marvelous.

 
 

Comments { 0 }

5 Notes (A studio visit with Robin Johnston)

 robinjohnstonnightsky

 

1.

Taped down on a table in resident artist Robin Johnston’s studio is a map of the stars. Next to it is smaller map, loose and folded and used, with a handwritten note in the margin: WE SAW FIREWORKS. A map handed out on the Fourth of July last summer, Robin tells us. Robin and her husband and her son (age 2) watched the sky light up above Penland.

 

2.

The moments of immanence that the artist experiences are collapsed into the work, to be revived or reimagined by the spectator when she enters its arena…–Ann Lauterbach, The Given and The Chosen

 

3.

Fireworks, family, the night sky, perception in summertime–Robin is collapsing these moments in her newest work. No, it’s more accurate to say: she’s recording them across the stretched map, each weft piece to be marked with a star’s position before it’s dyed and then the weaving begins. In the final part of the process, Robin will embroider the star charts of each season on the finished piece. This will take months and months. “I love tedious work,” she says quietly, grinning.

 

robinjohnstonnightsky2

 

4.

If you don’t believe that Robin loves tedious work, please note:

She’s the artist who gathered around 4,000 walnuts, soaked over a hundred of them, wrapped yarn around each one, unwrapped the dried strands, and used them to weave 143 Walnuts, the piece  hanging on the wall in the photograph below. Against another wall in her studio, next to an installation of walnuts still attached to strands suspended from the ceiling, is an old walnut picker. Her grandmother used it first–a handle attached to a metal cage, rolled over a carpet of grass to collect the fallen nuts on her sheep farm in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina. “Robin’s work deals with measuring time, capturing moments as they pass, and the sense of loss that accompanies their passing,” her website tells us.

 

robinjohnstonpenland

5.

One last note: “immanence” is the opposite of transcendence, and Robin Johnston is an artist residing in what’s in her earthly grasp: 4,000 walnuts, millions of stars, the moth wing-resilience of ikat tape, the fact that indigo is insoluble in water and must first be reduced to a form called indigo white. When the thread is dipped and then pulled from the vat, Robin explains, a molecular change occurs. The indigo reverts to its insoluble form. It retakes its blue from the air.

 

Photographs by Robin Dreyer; writing by Elaine Bleakney

Comments { 0 }

Kenny Pieper with Music

Musician Casey Driessen has posted a music video for one of the tunes on his new album, and the entire video is our neighbor Kenny Pieper and his assistant Jamie Campbell blowing glass in Kenny’s studio. As a music video, it’s pretty unusual. As a glassblowing video, it’s quite good–with snappy music!

Comments { 0 }

Photo(s) of the Week: Painted Warps

alke groppel-wegener painting a warp at Penland

Student Alke Groppel-Wegener experimenting with warp painting in the weaving studio. Alke teaches writing to art and design students at the University of Staffordshire in England. The university gave her a term off so she could take Robin Johnston’s weaving Concentration. The class was introduced to painted warps by visiting artist Andrea Donnelly.

 

painted warp

This is a single warp with a section painted by each member of the class. It will be wound onto a loom and woven into one long piece of cloth.

 

 

Comments { 0 }

A Short Story About a Knob

ultrasonic cleaner

A couple of weeks ago, staff member Elaine Bleakney posted this picture on our Instagram feed. It was captioned with an interchange she had with metals coordinator Ian Henderson, which mentioned the missing knob. (If you can’t read it, click on the picture to make it bigger.) Our friend Joe Lee (a.k.a. @clockfeathers on Instagram) suggested that someone could 3D print a new knob.

 

ian hendrson and daniel beck with printrbot

Joe follows Penland pretty closely, so he probably knew, from this blog or Facebook, that Ian (left) was half owner, with iron coordinator Daniel T. Beck (right), of an assemble-it-yourself 3D printer called a Printrbot.

 

knob-2

Here’s the printer, fully assembled.

 

knob-1

So Ian, who is quite the tinkerer, designed this knob in the 3D modeling software, which he had learned quite a bit about while working on this excellent project.

 

ultrasonic cleaner

He sent the file to the printer, and here is the ultrasonic cleaner, made whole again.

Comments { 2 }

Smash Party

 

Smash party. Definition: a gathering where breakable objects are hurled at the concrete.

Inside a certain coffee house at a certain craft school located in the (usually) tranquil Blue Ridge Mountains, a smash party occurs when a certain Crystal Thomas declares to a certain Loring Taoka: smash party. Then they wait. They wait, their caffeinated hearts pounding, until the aforementioned coffee house is clear of those with more delicate sensibilities.

At this point, a sacred box of chipped or broken mugs and glasses– set tenderly aside for the purpose of the smash party–is brought to the counter.

 

smashparty1

 

The first rule of smash party: smash.

Second rule: enlist a certain Y-Sam Ktul to sweep up the pieces.

The third rule of smash party: destruction enables creation. Or something like that.

 

smashparty2

 

 

Comments { 0 }
http://www.penland.org/blog/dui-chicago/ | nsw payroll tax | http://www.penland.org/blog/bankruptcy-search-free/ | queens bankruptcy attorney | dapoxetine prescription